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What did the Titanic's Interior Design Look Like?

The tragic tale of the Titanic is unforgettable. On 15th April, 1912 the unthinkable happened, and the unsinkable ship sunk. And yet there is still a certain mystery that surrounds the sunken vessel. There is a haunting curiosity that makes us wonder about the interior design of this luxurious craft that now lies below some 3,800 metres of water. Let us take you on a brief tour of this maritime marvel and explore the design styles of the ship that could never sink.

Departure in Design
Other ocean liners of the day were typically modelled after manor houses, but the Titanic departed from this tradition and made use of several different design styles from Empire to Renaissance to Louis XV. The goal of the grand design was to overwhelm and impress passengers and to give them the feeling that they were in a floating hotel.


Made famous by the incredible replica produced for the 1997 film, the Titanic's grand staircase was truly a work of art

The Grand Staircase
Perhaps made famous by the incredible replica produced for the 1997 film Titanic, the grand staircase was truly a work of art. The English oak masterpiece was designed in the neoclassical William and Mary style, while the wrought iron balustrades featured a Louis XIV style. Via the grand staircase, passengers could access almost all facilities available to first class.

First Class Luxuries
The Titanic provided many luxuries to her first class passengers including Turkish baths, a swimming pool, squash court, barber and even a darkroom to develop photos on the voyage. One unique feature on the Titanic was the gym where men, women and children could exercise during their own specific gym hours (men and women could not work out together). The state of the art exercise equipment included stationary bicycles, weights, a rowing machine and even electric horses and camels.


The state of the art exercise equipment included stationary bicycles, weights, a rowing machine and even electric horses and camels

Designed for First Class Taste

Some of the other amenities available to the first class passengers included a smoking room for men, a reading and writing room dominated mainly by women, a lounge modelled after the palace of Versailles and several restaurants and cafés. First class state rooms were decorated in a variety of design styles from Georgian to Jacobean to Italian Renaissance. Many rooms had private bathrooms, however there were shared lavatories in first class as well.


 First class state rooms were decorated in a variety of design styles from Georgian to Jacobean to Italian Renaissance

Second Class Accommodation
Seven decks of the Titanic were dedicated to accommodating the second class passengers. Public areas available to the middle class included a library, smoking room, dining salon and promenade decks. Yet another design style was featured in the library: the Adam style. Second class bedrooms resembled the first class staterooms, but contained bunk beds and were often shared by 2 passengers. Communal bathrooms were shared by second class passengers.


Public areas available to the middle class included a library, smoking room, dining salon and promenade decks

Third Class Rooms
The public rooms for third class passengers were not ornately decorated like those for first and second class. They were modest, yet comfortable as it seemed that White Star Line understood that most of their third class passengers were going to America to begin a new life, and therefore wanted to make the transition as comfortable as possible. Bedrooms were largely consistent of bunk beds and many passengers had to share bathrooms. For the 710 third class passengers on board, only 2 bathtubs were available; one for men and one for women.


The public rooms for third class passengers were modest, yet comfortable

The interior of the Titanic is truly inspiring. Impressed by this exquisite lost design? Discover the Nautical Interior Design & Lifestyle auction here on Catawiki. You can also sell your own Titanic memorabilia or nautical novelties at our auctions. Register for a free account to experience the joy of bidding, buying and selling online. 

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