Nr. 84851607

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Thonet - Adolf Loos - Stoel (2) - Café Capua -
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Thonet - Adolf Loos - Stoel (2) - Café Capua -

Pair of Café Capua chairs by Adolf Loos, beechwood, stained to simulate mahogany, with polished finish History of Café Capua: Café Capua (1, Johannesgasse 3). The Café Capua on Johannesgasse, just like Café Museum, was designed by Adolf Loos. The café is the only realized part of his school building project for Eugenie Schwarzwald in Johannesgasse (Design III). A large skylight illuminated the interior space. The pillars and walls were clad in onyx marble, and a cast of an ancient sculpture frieze was used as a beam finish towards the ceiling. Hanging bowls provided lighting, and large mirrors complemented the decor with its surrounding benches and chairs. The marble furnishings were typical of Adolf Loos, who had a preference for marble cladding. Loos ordered the chairs from Thonet. Loos set up a bar separately accessible from the street. Similar to the Kärntner Bar in the Kärntner Durchgang, built six years earlier, Loos used maximum space economy to accommodate 50 guests in the smallest area. Peter Altenberg, who regularly frequented the café with Loos, published the prose text "Café Capua. Conversation with a Sweet American" in 1915, which is set in this establishment. The name is a reference to the poem "Farewell to Vienna" written by Franz Grillparzer in 1843, in which the luxurious, lavish, and somewhat decadent life in Vienna is compared to "Capua of the spirits," similar to the ancient Capua where Hannibal's warriors lost their taste for war due to a life of indulgence. This name characterizes this Viennese café as a place of leisure and diversion. In the 1920s, the café was converted to night operation with music. In the early 1930s, it was renamed "Café de Paris" and redesigned. After World War II, the establishment was used as a U.S. military casino. In 1950, it burned down, and only a small part of the coffeehouse continued to operate as Espresso Capua until the 1970s. However, the decor of the small venue no longer resembled the work of Adolf Loos.

Nr. 84851607

Niet meer beschikbaar
Thonet - Adolf Loos - Stoel (2) - Café Capua -

Thonet - Adolf Loos - Stoel (2) - Café Capua -

Pair of Café Capua chairs by Adolf Loos, beechwood, stained to simulate mahogany, with polished finish
History of Café Capua:
Café Capua (1, Johannesgasse 3).

The Café Capua on Johannesgasse, just like Café Museum, was designed by Adolf Loos. The café is the only realized part of his school building project for Eugenie Schwarzwald in Johannesgasse (Design III). A large skylight illuminated the interior space. The pillars and walls were clad in onyx marble, and a cast of an ancient sculpture frieze was used as a beam finish towards the ceiling. Hanging bowls provided lighting, and large mirrors complemented the decor with its surrounding benches and chairs. The marble furnishings were typical of Adolf Loos, who had a preference for marble cladding. Loos ordered the chairs from Thonet.

Loos set up a bar separately accessible from the street. Similar to the Kärntner Bar in the Kärntner Durchgang, built six years earlier, Loos used maximum space economy to accommodate 50 guests in the smallest area. Peter Altenberg, who regularly frequented the café with Loos, published the prose text "Café Capua. Conversation with a Sweet American" in 1915, which is set in this establishment.

The name is a reference to the poem "Farewell to Vienna" written by Franz Grillparzer in 1843, in which the luxurious, lavish, and somewhat decadent life in Vienna is compared to "Capua of the spirits," similar to the ancient Capua where Hannibal's warriors lost their taste for war due to a life of indulgence. This name characterizes this Viennese café as a place of leisure and diversion.

In the 1920s, the café was converted to night operation with music. In the early 1930s, it was renamed "Café de Paris" and redesigned. After World War II, the establishment was used as a U.S. military casino. In 1950, it burned down, and only a small part of the coffeehouse continued to operate as Espresso Capua until the 1970s. However, the decor of the small venue no longer resembled the work of Adolf Loos.

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